Glenn Walls

Death of Architecture (No difference at all. Part 5)

Posted in Death of Architecture (No difference at all. Part 5), Uncategorized by Glenn Walls on August 7, 2016

Death 17

Death of Architecture (No difference at all. Part 5). Mirrors, perspex on wood, skater wheels. 2016

Death 20

Death of Architecture (No difference at all. Part 5). Mirrors, perspex on wood, skater wheels. 2016

 

Death of Architecture (Why do we…., Part 5)

Posted in Death of Architecture (Why do we...., Part 4), Uncategorized by Glenn Walls on August 7, 2016

Death 26

Death of Architecture (Why do we…., Part 5). Perspex on board, mirrors, mirror perspex & wood. 2016

 

 

The Death of Architecture (Part 4)

Posted in Uncategorized by Glenn Walls on July 26, 2016

Death 36

The Death of Architecture (Part 4) . Based on Superstudio, The Continuous Monument. Mirrors, mirrored perspex on wood, skater wheels

Death 34

The Death of Architecture (Part 4) . Based on Superstudio, The Continuous Monument. Mirrors, mirrored perspex on wood, skater wheels

Death 61

The Death of Architecture (Part 4) . Based on Superstudio, The Continuous Monument. Mirrors, mirrored perspex on wood, skater wheels

The Death of Architecture (Part 4) . Based on Superstudio, The Continuous Monument. Mirrors, mirrored perspex on wood, skater wheels

Death 65

The Death of Architecture (Part 4) . Based on Superstudio, The Continuous Monument. Mirrors, mirrored perspex on wood, skater wheels

The Death of Architecture 1

The Death of Architecture (Part 4) Mirrored perspex on wood.

The Death of 3

The Death of Architecture (Part 4) Mirrored perspex on wood.

The Death of Architecture (Part 3)

Posted in The Death of Architecture (Part 3), Uncategorized by Glenn Walls on July 26, 2016

Death 5

The Death of Architecture (Part 3). Mirror perspex, Jelutong and wool rug

Death 50

The Death of Architecture (Part 3). Mirror perspex, Jelutong and wool rug

Death 49

The Death of Architecture (Part 3). Mirror perspex, Jelutong and wool rug

1

The Death of Architecture (Part 3). Development work. Jelutong

2

The Death of Architecture (Part 3). Development work. Jelutong

4

The Death of Architecture (Part 3). Development work. Jelutong

3

The Death of Architecture (Part 3). Development work. Jelutong

5

The Death of Architecture (Part 3). Development work. Jelutong

Death of Architecture: Farnsworth House (Part 2)

Posted in Death of Architecture: Farnsworth House (Part 2), Uncategorized by Glenn Walls on March 14, 2016

Farnsworth House Final

Death of Architecture: Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, Farnsworth House (Part 2)

The Death of Architecture. Superstudio (Part 1)

Superstudio Cite 5

Super Suspended 2. Mirrored tiles, skate wheels, various materials. 2016

Based on the Continuous Monument by Superstudio. Background taken from Cite de I’Architecture et du Patrimoine.

I am Australian (Installation)

Posted in Uncategorized by Glenn Walls on June 26, 2015

1868 Cricket 11 1868 Cricket 15 1868 Cricket 14

The first Australian Test team of cricketers, selected for a Tour of England in 1868 were all Aboriginal players – years before the first white Australian cricket team went abroad. The team arrived in England via boat on 13 May, 1868 and generated considerable public interest. Unfortunately not all of it complimentary with The Times describing the tourists as “the conquered natives of a convict colony” before going on to decry them as “a travestie upon cricketing at Lords”.[1] The team was on the field for 99 out of a possible 126 days. Fatigue and illness was a serious problem. One player died of tuberculosis mid-tour. Despite the success of the tour there is no evidence that any Aboriginal player received payment. On their return the players dispersed, and many died prematurely and in obscurity. Any possibility of subsequent tours ended with the implementation of the Victorian Aboriginal Protection Act 1869, which restricted Aborigines’ freedom of association and movement – so no overseas travel Originating in England, the popularity of cricket in certain parts of the world is due to English colonisation. Cricket is a game steeped in tradition. Little has changed over the years. Hence the installation I am Australian uses the language of Modernism, to highlight the injustices imposed on our indigenous sports players and how I reconcile as an Australian with past decisions such as the White Australia policy that impacted the lives of so many.

[1] Indigenous first-class and Test cricketers, 1860s to 1960s, 2013. Australian Government, Viewed 25th May 2015, http://www.australia.gov.au/about-australia/australian-story/indigenous-cricketers#firstTestTeam

I am Australian 2015

Posted in Uncategorized by Glenn Walls on May 7, 2015

I am Australian 1

I am Australian. Acrylic on wood . 29 x 42 cms each panel. 2015

New Mass Housing

Posted in New Mass Housing by Glenn Walls on September 30, 2014

New Mass Housing 2

New Mass Housing. Digital Print. 2014

Architecture + Sport + Super

Posted in Architecture + Sport + Super by Glenn Walls on September 10, 2014

Cricket 4

Cricket 3

Cricket 7

Cricket 11

Cricket bat 6

Cricket bat 1

Supercricket. Mirror perspex and wood cricket wickets. 2014

White People

Posted in White People by Glenn Walls on August 12, 2014

White People 7        White People 6

White People 3        White People 1

White People and their Spaces. Mirror acrylic on wood. 2014

More to come…….

What you would see if you were Superstudio….

Domestic Scale

Posted in Domestic Scale by Glenn Walls on August 12, 2014

Dieter Rams 1     Dieter Rams 3

German designer Dieter Rams (1932 – ) epitomised the modernist aesthetic within his designs that adhered to principle of ‘form follows function’.

As head of design at Braun, the German consumer electronics manufacturer, Rams emerged as one of the most influential industrial designers of the late 20th century by defining an elegant, legible, yet rigorous visual language for its products (Design Museum, 2014).

Rams’ objective was to design useful products, which would be easy to operate (Design Museum, 2014). Rams embraced the modernist aesthetic of ‘less is more’ Rams’ designs always looked effortless with an exquisite simplicity borne from rigorous tests and experiments with new materials and an obsessive attention to detail to ensure that each piece appeared flawlessly coherent. Dieter Rams remains an enduring inspiration for younger designers, notably Jonathan Ive and Jasper Morrison, who have acknowledged his influence in their work at Apple and Rowenta respectively (Design Museum, 2014).

My work focuses on the use of Rams radio design series for Braun, including RT20 table radio, 1961, as a framework to construct narratives that modify the designer original intentions by creating variant surfaces on the object. I am interested in how I can construct narratives by adding new layers to these objects in order to imbue them with personal significance. Through the placement of text and pattern that interrupts the modernist aesthetic, I envisage how we are able to occupy and personalise these objects to our own agenda.

3

Everything popular is wrong (Oscar Wilde) Wood, Perspex, working clock, 2013

2

Aim Higher / Aim Lower. Wood, Perspex, 2013, 130 x 250 x 95 mm

1

There is a possibility something will fuck up today. Wood, Perspex, working clock, 2013

Dieter Rams Clocks 3

Dieter Rams Clocks 4

Glenn Walls’ series of sculptures could be mistaken at first glance, for everyday domestic appliances. Based on the RT20 radio designed by Dieter Rams in 1961, Walls interrogates the tenets of Modernism by transforming the radio into a functioning clock and applying disruptive text that subverts the minimalist simplicity of the design. In works such as There is a Possibility Something Will Fuck Up Today, 2013, this modification serves to unpick Modernism’s master narratives – such as the notion of creating a definitive design prototype appropriate for every person and context as seen in the International Style of Le Corbusier. Fittingly, this series is juxtaposed next to iconic furniture such as Grand Confort, 1928-30, by Le Corbusier, Jeanneret and Perriand, plus Marcel Breuer’s Wassily chair, 1925-26, that forms part of the exhibition design schema. Through visual and conceptual interference, Walls is able to personalise the aesthetic principles of Modernism, harnessing their attributes to serve his own agenda.

Architects

Posted in Architects by Glenn Walls on April 21, 2014

Architects 3

Architects 2

Architects 4

Architects 5

Architects, 2014

Large scale bookcovers

Posted in Large Scale Bookcovers by Glenn Walls on April 21, 2014

Self and Boring Others

Self and Boring Others, 2014

No Difference At All - Uganda

No Difference At All is based on R. D. Laing 1961 book, Self and Others (seen in the top work). Eminent Italian graphic designer Germano Facetti designed the cover. R.D. Laing was a Scottish psychiatrist who wrote extensively on mental illness. The World Health Organisation considered homosexuality a mental illness until 1993. Using Facetti design of Laing’s book cover, No Difference At All highlights that sexual preference within the LGBTI community is no longer considered a mental illness by most western countries, however countries such as Uganda recently have imposed harsh anti gay laws and continue to label it as a mental disorder. The three circles are the colour of the Uganda flag. The red circle of the work is a mirror where we see a reflection of ourselves, noting that there is no difference at all, legally or medically between any of us. We are all the same no matter what our sexual preference may be.

Humanising

Posted in Humanising Le Corbusier by Glenn Walls on March 2, 2014
Humanise Le Corbusier 2
Glenn Walls. Humanising Le Corbusier. Plan Voisin for Paris. 2014

Le Corbusier

Le Corbusier (Charles-Édouard Jeanneret). Plan Voisin for Paris. 1925.

LC 3.1

Glenn Walls. Humanising Le Corbusier. Plan Voisin for Paris. 2014

The Plan Voisin is a solution for the center of Paris, drawn between 1922 and 1925 by Le Corbusier. 
The plan for 1925 seems to be a direct transposition of the diagram of Contemporary City for three million 
drawn in 1922. Included are buildings available in a regular orthogonal grid occupying a very important part 
of the right bank of the Seine. The space is highly structured with two new traffic arteries pierced through 
the city, one on the east-west, the other on a north-south. Their role is not limited to the organization of 
Paris, as were the advances of Haussmann: they pass through the fortifications and the suburban area. They 
have the ambition to link the capital to the four corners of the country, the major French and European cities. 
The crossroads at the intersection of these two avenues is the center of the plan, the center of the city 
in central France. (http://densityatlas.org/casestudies/profile.php?id=99)

How to avoid everything

Posted in Uncategorized by Glenn Walls on February 6, 2014

How to avoid everything booklet

How to yellow 2

How to avoid everything booklet 1

How to avoid everything booklet 2

Glenn Walls, How to avoid everything, Yellow booklet, Perspex,

10 x 15 cms, 2014

Prototype for Sophisticated Living 4 (Team Australia) Curated by Veronica Tello. Part 2 (Revisited)

Team 10

Team 22

Team 32

Team 41

Team 27

Team 40

Team 37

I am Australian

Posted in I am Australian by Glenn Walls on November 21, 2013

I am Australian 3

I am Australian Final 2

I am Australian. I will wear black until something blacker comes out. Perspex on wood. 2014 (study for larger work).

I am Australian. I will wear white until something whiter comes out. Perspex on wood. 2013/14 (study for larger work).

I am Australian is based Marcel Duchamp cover design for the Surrealist oriented publication Minotaure No 6, 1934. Minotaure was published between 1933 and 1939. The magazine focused on articles relating to Surrealist principles and theories, architecture and also contained the first published essays of the famed French psychiatrist and philosopher, Jacques Lacan (Vol. 1 & 4). Duchamp cover utilizes modernist principles of simplicity and lent itself to the redesign of the aboriginal flag. Alfred Deakin was Australia’s second prime minister and instrumental in the writing of the White Australia policy.

Nothing for me. Part 2

Posted in Uncategorized by Glenn Walls on October 14, 2013

Villa Savoye 8.1

Glenn Walls. Modernist architecture is a lie.

Le Corbusier & Pierre Jeanneret, Villa Savoye, 1928 – 31, Digital Print  2013.

Shot on location at Le Corbusier & Pierre Jeanneret, Villa Savoye. Poissy, France. September 2013.

BC 8

Glenn Walls. Ludwig Mies van der Rohe designed nothing for me.

Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, Barcelona Pavilion, 1929.

Shot on location at Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, Barcelona Pavilion. Barcelona, Spain. September 2013.

Villa Savoye 12

Glenn Walls. Le Corbusier designed nothing for me.

Le Corbusier & Pierre Jeanneret, Villa Savoye, 1928 – 31.

Shot on location at Le Corbusier & Pierre Jeanneret, Villa Savoye. Poissy, France. September 2013.

Works

Posted in Works by Glenn Walls on July 14, 2013

Super Wheels

Superwheels. Mirror tiles, skateboard wheels. 2013

Superlost 95

Prototype for Sophisticated Living No 4. Balsa wood, paint, 2007 -13

I am Anonymous 2

I Am Anonymous. Mirror perspex, wood. 120 x 240 cms. 2007 – 13

Dead Artist/Dead Art

Posted in Dead Artist/Dead Art by Glenn Walls on April 17, 2013

Dead 8

Ulises Carrion No 1 & No 2, Pencil on paper, 19 x 29 cms, 2013

How to Avoid Everything. Theoretical Book Covers 2013

Posted in How to avoid everything by Glenn Walls on April 17, 2013

How to avoid 6

How to avoid being you. Hiding your being in the built environment. Perspex on wood. 2013

How to avoid 3

How to avoid being you. Hiding your being in the built environment. Perspex on wood. 2013

How to Avoid Modernism – Ulises Carrión

Posted in How to Avoid odernism -Ulises Carrión by Glenn Walls on December 3, 2012

Carrion 6

How to Avoid Modernism – Ulises Carrión

Pencil on Graph paper. 2012

Ulises Carrión is credited with being one of the first artists to write a general theory about artists’ books. His influential essay, ‘The New Art of Making Books,’ written in 1975, analyzes the traditional form of books in the context its tactile, visual, and intellectual merits. Carrión’s work with visual and concrete poetry expanded the use of the book as a medium for artistic expression that uses the page as an alternative gallery space.

The above information is taken from the following website:

http://www.library.vcu.edu/jbc/speccoll/davidetcarrion.html

Life without Objects

Posted in Life without Objects by Glenn Walls on January 29, 2012

Book covers. Installation view.

Includes (lower right hand side): Shelter. Le Corbusier, Unité d’Habitation ( Version 1). Perspex on wood. 2012. 19 x 29 cms (study for larger work)

Prototype for Sophisticated Living No 1 (Version 2). Mirror tiles, skateboard wheels. 65 x 65 x 45 (approx.). 2007/2012

Book covers. Installation view. Front sculpture: Hoodwink (after Sean). Jelutong, Mirror perspex, Mirror tiles, white tape. 2012. (Prototype)

Shelter. Le Corbusier, Unité d’Habitation ( Version 1). Perspex on wood. 2012. 19 x 29 cms (study for larger work)

Installation view. TCB Inc. Untitled (Baseball Bats). Baseball bats and mirror tiles. Dimension variable. 2012

Book covers. Installation view.

Includes: Shelter. Le Corbusier, Unité d’Habitation ( Version 1, study for larger work), Everything Popular is Wrong, All Art Is Useless. Perspex on wood. 2012. 19 x 29 cms. 2012

Hoodwink (after Sean). Jelutong, Mirror perspex, Mirror tiles, white tape. 2012 (Prototype)

Life without Objects.

Opening Wednesday 15th February 2012

6 – 8pm

TCB

12 Waratah Pl  Melbourne VIC 3000. Wed – Sat 12 noon – 6pm

Exhibition dates: 15 Feb – 3 March

Nothing for Me.

Posted in Nothing for me by Glenn Walls on November 4, 2011

Glenn Walls. Ludwig Mies van der Rohe designed nothing for me, Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, Barcelona Pavilion, 1929), Digital Print, 2011

Shot on location at Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, Barcelona Pavilion  (1929), Barcelona, Spain. September 2011

Superlost Again 2011: Theoretical Book Covers

Posted in Superlost Again 2011 by Glenn Walls on July 6, 2011

      

Democracy in America. From barbarism to decadence without civilisation in between. Perspex on wooden board. Version 1, 29 x 42 cms, 2011

If you are not too long, I will wait here for you all my life. Perspex on wooden board. Version 1, 29 x 42 cms, 2011

       

Bigamy is having one husband to many. Monogamy is the same. Perspex on wooden board. Version 1, 29 x 42 cms, 2011

Everything Popular is Wrong. Power and Participation in Contemporary Architecture. Perspex on wooden board. Version 1, 29 x 42 cms, 2011

        

Chronic Psychoses and Recovery from Modernist Theory. Perspex on wooden board. Version 1, 29 x 42 cms, 2011

All art is quite useless. New Directions in African Architecture. Perspex on wooden board. Version 1, 29 x 42 cms, 2011

Superlost Again 2011

John Buckley Gallery

13 July – 6 August 2011


Going Home (Part 2)

Posted in Going Home (Part 2) by Glenn Walls on June 6, 2011

Glenn Walls. Le Corbusier designed nothing for me. Digital print. 2011. Part of the Going Home (Part 2) series

Modernist architects Ludwig Mies van der Rohe and Le Corbusier proposed buildings intended for an ordered, structured life and contemplative viewing. What attracted me to their domestic buildings were their pure forms, cleanliness, timelessness and strong sense of interplay between masculine/feminine and public/private space. I only know these architects’ works via books, documentaries and the web; I am from the suburbs, raised without connection to modernist architecture. My work seeks ways to link my experiences of domestic buildings with the pure forms and theories of these architects. To achieve this I have photographed my father outside his house. Through research, experimentation and production I link these spaces through the use of text, white electrical tape, human figures and objects, into the public/private spaces of Mies and Le Corbusier.

Glenn Walls. My other house is modernist. Digital print. 2011. Part of the Going Home (Part 2) series

The Grid. Le Corbusier, Unite d’Habitation 1946 – 52. 2011 & 2012

Posted in The Grid by Glenn Walls on February 20, 2011

The Grid. Le Corbusier, Unite d’Habitation 1946 – 52 Vs Superstudio. Ink on paper. 2012

Shelter (Aboriginal Flag). Le Corbusier, Unité d’Habitation ( Version 1). Perspex on wood. 2012. 19 x 29 cms (study for larger work)

The Australian Aboriginal Flag is a flag that represents Indigenous Australians. It was designed in 1971 by Aboriginal artist Harold Thomas, who is descended from the Luritjapeople of Central Australia and holds Intellectual propertyrights in the flag’s design. The flag was originally designed for the land rights movement, and it became a symbol of the Aboriginal people ofAustralia.

The symbolic meaning of the flag colours (as stated by Harold Thomas) is:

  • Black: Represents the Aboriginal people of Australia
  • Red: Represents the red earth, the red ochre and a spiritual relation to the land
  • Yellow: Represents the Sun, the giver of life and protector

Superlost again

Posted in Superlost again by Glenn Walls on June 17, 2010

Glenn Walls, Duel Meaning of Things, 2009. Exhibited at Westspace Sept 2009. Part of the Superlost series.

Glenn Walls, Duel Meaning of Things, 2009                  Superstudio, The Continuous Monument, 1968 -71

Quaderna designed by Superstudio, 1970. Reworked for Superlost installation 2010. Back image taken from Zonatta Magazine.

Superlost. Exhibited at RMIT Project Space and Spare Ro0m, 2010

Projects for Total Urbanisation

Posted in Projects for Total Urbanisation by Glenn Walls on June 17, 2010

Prototype for Sophisticated Living 4 (Team Australia) Curated by Veronica Tello

Posted in Sophisticated Living 4 (Team Australia) by Glenn Walls on January 23, 2009

Team Australia. Group show at the Carlton Hotel and Studios. December 2008

Team Australia is:
jeremy drape, emily ferretti, veronica kent, annika koops, brendan lee, natalie ryan, utako shindo, jackson slattery, salote tawale, glenn walls

Curated by Veronica Tello

Prototype for Sophisticated Living 3

Posted in Prototype for Sophisticated Living 3 by Glenn Walls on January 7, 2009

adidas-skull-21

prototypes-for-sophisticated-living-567-8

prototype-for-sophisticated-living-6-7

Prototype for Sophisticated Living 3 exhibited at RMIT gallery, December 2008

Going Home

Posted in Going home (Digital prints) by Glenn Walls on December 6, 2008

Glenn Walls                                                                                                 Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, Farnsworth House, 1945 – 51

Untitled (Going Home) is a series of digital prints photographed in the house I grew up in. Located in Melbourne the house had been in the family for almost fifty years. However growing up in this house, I dreamt of living in another world, a modernist world. This world consisted of clean lines, white walls and minimalist furniture that had no connection to past histories or memories.

In June 2006,  the house was left vacant and up for sale. Realising the house would soon be out of my family possession, I went back to document my connection to the house, its history and more importantly my memories. For a few short weeks I had the opportunity to act out my childhood fantasy of connecting my family home to a particular form of modernism I only know through books and the Internet, however at the same time allowing the house to shine in its blandness as a place of memory.

 

Prototype for Sophisticated Living 1 (Broke exhibition)

Posted in Prototype for Sophisticated Living 1 (Broke exhibition) by Glenn Walls on July 3, 2008

Prototype for Sophisticated Living 1 exhibited at the Carlton Hotel & Studios 2008 in the group show Broke

Room 2

Prototype for Sophisticated Living 1 for the exhibition Broke At the Carlton Hotel & Studios 2008

Let’s talk about it, or new utopias

By

Rebecca Coates is an independent curator and writer, Adjunct Curator at Australian Centre for Contemporary Art (ACCA), and currently undertaking a PhD at the University of Melbourne looking at site-specific, ephemeral based installations.

Blubberland: The Dangers of Happiness , a new book by Elizabeth Farrelly, coins a new term for a new form of architectural horrible-ness.  For Farrelly, Western society is now a “Blubberland”, a society in which ‘most of us have more than enough of what we need and more than enough of what we want as well’.  As she continues, most of the inhabitants of Blubberland have far too much and more not only of material goods but also bodily fat, ‘to a degree that is dangerous for them and for the future of the planet.’  Thus the development of the McMansion: vast sprawling architectural monstrosities with too many bedrooms, an equal number of bathrooms, four-space garages, and so many windows that those commissioning them can’t afford the curtains.  And filled they are to groaning point with all the stuff and possessions a family could not possibly want, let alone need.
The disillusionment and rejection of modernist architectural ideals by the 1960s Italian group Superstudio might be akin to a similar rejection of today’s faceless, tasteless, mass-consumist architecture in what was once the green belt.  Once only the domain of savvy architects and design aficionados, Superstudio’s little-known architectural vision is undergoing a cult revival as architects and artists look to articulate their dissatisfaction with popular trends and developments.
Founded in Florence by a group of radical young architects in 1966, Superstudio laid out their vision of a built environment, ‘an efficient minimalist space that provides an ordered existence .. [The space should] not [be] constructed on the whims of consumerism and fashion.’   The location of this new form of avant-garde thinking is of course not accidental: Florence, Italy: a town ‘where all such contradictions become evident … [a town which] stands historically symbolic.’   And what better vehicle to launch their manifesto than Italian Vogue: anarchy and avant-garde are nothing if not fashionable.

To read the full transcript click on the Articles icon on the right hand side.

Room 1


How to avoid Modernism

Posted in How to avoid modernism (Video installation) by Glenn Walls on July 3, 2008

How to avoid Modernism at Gertrude Contemporary Art Spaces, April 2008.

How too

In 2005 l created a scale model of Philip Johnson’s Glass House (1949). As with Farnsworth House I was attracted to Johnson’s simple lines, geometrical forms and large floor-to-ceiling windows that opened up the interior to the outside world. It was not until 2008 that the thought of using the model for the work How to avoid modernism (2008) came to fruition and was exhibited at Gertrude Contemporary Art Spaces in April 2008 (slide). Glass House 1

Philip Johnson, Glass House, 1949

Superlost

Posted in Superlost by Glenn Walls on July 3, 2008

Superlost



Superlost

Mountain (Superstudio)

Posted in Green by Glenn Walls on July 3, 2008

Text Me

Posted in Text Me by Glenn Walls on July 3, 2008

Text Me at Spacement

Text Me at Spacement

Text Me at Spacement

Text Me at Spacement

Text Me
Spacement, Melbourne
August 17th to September 2nd 2006

By Christine Morrow.  Curator, Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney

Published in Eyeline Number 61: Spring 2006

Text Me presented artworks on the theme of messaging. Curator, Glenn Walls, assembled a group that included him, four artists who regularly work with text – Rose Nolan, Sanné Mestrom, Gabrielle de Vietri and Danielle Freakley – together with the design duo Pandarosa.

The works incorporated the motif of text, or oblique references to it, across various technologies of expression not restricted to the typographic form. Although the artists showed an awareness of the history of concrete poetry, conceptual art and particularly the Art & Language movement, they avoided rehashing any of the old concerns of structural linguistics about the systematic features inherent in language’s operation.

The exhibition did not focus on the structures of language per se but its instrumentality in building relationships or communities. By foregrounding the social functions of language and privileging individual utterances, the exhibition closely examined various intimacies created by speech and writing. Certain of the artists achieved this by inserting themselves into the work, or by using first-person to second-person speech, as if to whisper to the viewer, this is about you and me. Others created this intimacy by expressing personal vulnerability. These various strategies seemed to run the spectrum bounded by the two extremes of what the imperative Text me can signify: on the one hand a breezy sign off meaning let’s talk and on the other a neediness of the you never write, you never call…variety.

Sanné Mestrom has become known for large-scale painted wall texts of quasi biblical messages rendered with dizzying spatial illusions. By contrast, in Text Me she presented a series of large black and white images that were so degraded they appeared to be copies of copies. They depicted a performance by the artist that involved smearing her painted body along a wall. There was no typographic text in this work; instead Mestrom presented the evidence of using her body as a writing instrument to create what could be seen to function like a kind of graffiti tag, based on the body leaving behind its own indexical signature on the wall. However, the immediacy of effect it sought to create was undone by presenting the documentation of the work rather than either performing the work or exhibiting the smeared wall.

Pandarosa presented a wall-painting framed by two freestanding cardboard forms painted with ink drawings of each of the two members of the collective. The painted wall featured their signature style of silhouette shapes overlaid with organic-looking spidery drawing. It appeared to spell out Pandarosa. It too functioned as a graffiti tag, but in a more literal way than did Mestrom’s work. The work’s main content was a representation of its own authors who signed it thrice over: once by creating it in their signature style, a second time by writing their name large within it and a third time by presenting images of each of the two of them framing the work like bookends. As we might expect from graphic designers, there was an overt concern with the way text’s typographical features mediate its signification. But in this instance, the duo achieved a kind of anti-typography for there as a partial breakdown of legibility in the individual letters and their sequencing.

Glenn Walls presented an installation that featured a crumbling wall supporting a puzzling assortment of images. These functioned like conceptual clues needing interpretation. This work was also a kind of graffiti tag, or signature writ large, but a very subtle one. By exhibiting a wall, the artist invoked his own surname, Walls, in the form of a rebus. The wall was papered with a repeated pattern of symbols reminiscent of a personal coat-of-arms based on an assortment of mementi mori: including a modernist building, a retro car, three skulls and an urn. An image of the artist appeared separately in each of the framed photographs displayed on the wall, but in them he was not really himself. Instead he functioned as a kind of blank person on which to hang messages and monograms. The entire effect was to generate a slippage between logos, the plural of logo (or logotype), and logos, the word. This wall appeared to simultaneously break down and reconstitute itself; through its self-referential play, it absorbed the signature, transformed and diffused it……….

Christine Morrow

To read the full transcript click on the Articles icon on the right hand side.

Men

Posted in Men (Video installation) by Glenn Walls on July 3, 2008

Men exhibited at Westspace Inc

Men exhibited at Westspace Inc

Men exhibited at Westspace Inc

Men exhibited at Westspace Inc

Men exhibited at Westspace Inc

Digital

Posted in Digital by Glenn Walls on July 3, 2008

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 52 other followers